Papierwerke 2 und 3D

P. ASSMANN, E. BEIERHEIMER, K. BORCHERT, H. CMELKA, B. DAUM, T. FINK, M. HOFMANN-GÖTTLICHER, I. LOITZL, R. MITTRINGER, D. PEEVA, B. TSCHAIKNER, W. WEER

Vernissage: 
Samstag, 31. Januar 2015 - 17:00
3. 2. 2015 - 6. 3. 2015

Opening: Saturday 31.01.15 at 5 p.m.

An exhibition in cooperation with MONDI Paper Sales GmbH. and PAPIERMACHERMUSEUM.

With:

PETER ASSMANN
EVA BEIERHEIMER 
KIRSTEN BORCHERT 
HELGA CMELKA 
BABSI DAUM 
TONE FINK 
MICHAELA HOFMANN-GÖTTLICHER 
INA LOITZL 
ROBERT MITTRINGER 
DARINA PEEVA 
BIANCA TSCHAIKNER 
WALTER WEER

“Not only can paper‘wait’, as the saying goes, or is paper ‘patient’, as the saying goes in German. It is, in fact, a highly special (arts/ artificial) basic material. For centuries, it has served as the basisforswift sketches, drafts and elaborate pictures alike, the formats ranging from tiny to huge. For just as long as that, however, it has been used as a basic material in the production of three-dimensional art works, too. The Japanese art of origami is just one of them. Sculptures made from paper were actually greatly developed further in the 20th century, whether applied as a conscious sign by symbolising the use of everyday materials, such as in the“arte povera”movement,or in the form of papier mâché,or cardboard boxes used in a modular manner: paper has long become a natural starting point in the shaping process of three-dimensional design.
The great freedom imparted by paper as a material, together with its practically omnipresent availability, is a highly special invitation to the arts, presenting itself white and ‘innocent’ and fully open to any  gesture,or intervention. It is this very freedom that has continuously been used and developed further.You can draw or paint on it, print images on it using the most varied techniques including highly sophisticated computer-based procedures, or fragment it, crumple it, tear it up and put the bits together again, re-arranging them anew. Additionally, paper can be processed to utmost perfection; high¬¬ly evolved special papers immediately bestow an extra value to the piece of art they are used for.However, paper is at all times the bearer of the most direct expression of the artist. It seems closer than any other material, almost as if it were a second skin.

Especially in Austria, the development of art over the last few decades has not only been characterised by a particular affinityto the tradition of drawing – and of course here we need to mention the great model figures from the early 20th century, such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschkaand Alfred Kubin – but equally by working paper from a sculptural point of view. In the light of all that, this comprehensive arts perspectivetaken here illustrating the use of paper is more than just a focused observation of the material of paper per se, but is indeeda wide stocktaking approach of different design considerations found in contemporary art.

Seen against this artistic background, paper is a very deliberately chosen material, so much so that it is a concept unto itself. Turning out to be much more permanent than one might think at first glance when paper looks all too fragile, it stands both for artistic swiftness and artistic longevity, both for fresh spontaneity and memories of the past, thus conveying the strength of both artistic patience and artistic impatience.” [Peter Assmann]